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(Source: lonestray)

By Lakela

(Source: lonestray)

lonestray:

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This is actually a Husky or another breed/mix with similar characteristics to a wolf.

The anon was referring to this GIF. Sorry for the mistake! ^^

Initially, I saw this GIF and thought it was a mix/breed similar to a wolf. Now that I actually thoroughly look at the characteristics, this is likely a breed of domestic dog with similar characteristics to the wolf.

  • Wolves will not have sharply defined tail tips; most often, their tail tips are black or not as pronounced of a black
  • This dog has a defined white tail tip. (That was actually the first thing that threw me off.)
  • Wolves have a caudal mark/scent gland (precaudal gland), a dark spot positioned 3-4 inches beneath the base of the tail, that can be a few different shapes. 
  • Some domestic dogs, (most likely on dogs with wolf heritage or old working northern breed lines,) have the mark itself on the tail, but it is not a functioning/working precaudal gland. 
  • This dog appears to have a marking similar to the precaudal gland, (the second thing that threw me off.)

Another thing is the possible curling of the tail; this animal looks like it has a slightly curled tail. Feel free to refer back to my other post with more physical characteristics to distinguish between domestic dogs, wolfdogs, and wolves!

This post won’t be deleted so that this GIF can possibly get the information out about the few subtle differences between a dog or wolfdog and a wolf that can be missed when trying to distinguish characteristics. 

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(Source: lonestray)

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(Source: lonestray)

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(Source: lonestray)

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(Source: lonestray)

lonestray:

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Note to Followers:

I recently have received a message from an anon saying that this is a Husky. This is almost definitely not a pure Husky, or even a Husky mixed with a Malamute or German Shepherd. 

Judging from the characteristics, this is possibly a very high-content wolfdog; it is nearly impossible to distinguish a high-content wolfdog from a “pure” wolf. Wolfdogs, as well as some domestic dog breeds, can share very similar characteristics and traits to the wolf as a result of having mutual genetics or originating from the same species. 

The reason I put “pure” in quotations is because with the extirpation and near extinction of the gray wolf species from the lower 48 states by 1960, many private individuals kept high-content wolfdogs or wolves, and thousands were released into the wilderness over time, including today. With that in mind, there were and are also many breeders who sell their wolves or wolfdogs, and thousands of owners release their wolfdogs into the wilderness annually. With that accumulating over a period of time, who can really say what a “pure” wolf is anymore? There isn’t an existing test to 100% accurately determine a wolfdog’s percentage of wolf. It is very likely that there is no longer any real “pure” wolves except possibly in the untouched, isolated areas of Alaska and Canada, and other regions. 

Here are some of the distinguishable attributes between wolves, Huskies, Malamutes, and German Shepherds. []

Ears:

  • Wolves: Small to medium; pricked, slightly rounded; heavily furred inside
  • Husky: Medium; triangular, pointed; high set
  • Malamute: Small to medium; triangular with slightly rounded tips; not high set
  • German Shepherd: Medium to large; moderately pointed to rounded tips

Eyes:

  • Wolves: Distinguished pupils from iris; almond-shaped eyes, ringed in black & obliquely set with corner lines intersecting towards the nose; they are any shade of brown (except dark brown or black), amber, yellow, and green but never blue
  • Husky: Almond-shaped; brown, blue; bi-eyed or particolored
  • Malamute: Obliquely set; yellow to brown ringed in black in all but the reds; reds have brown pigmentation around eyes; no blue eyes
  • German Shepherd: almond-shaped; slightly obliquely set; dark eyes

Skull:

  • Wolves: Wedge-shaped; (1) orbital angle— angle between a line drawn through upper & lower edges of eye socket & line drawn across top of the skull— is more acute in wolves; 40-45 degree; dogs have wider angle of 53-60 degrees; (2) the tympanic bullae— two dome-like protrusions on base of skull behind sockets of lower jaw— are large, convex and spherical; in dogs, smaller, more compressed & slightly crumpled
  • Husky: Slightly rounded skull
  • Malamute: Broad skull
  • German Shepherd: Wedge-shaped

Nose:

  • Wolves: Black; longer & broader snout
  • Husky: Black nose in grays, tans & blacks; liver nose in copper dogs, pink in white dogs
  • Malamute: Black in all, but the reds can be brown
  • German Shepherd: Predominantly black

Face/Mask:

  • Wolves: Blended; neither sharply contrasted or white; never a widow’s peak
  • Husky: Markings on head/face common; widow’s peak to a variety of masks; some masks striking & not found in other breeds
  • Malamute: Slight furrow between eyes; distinct widow’s peak; large, bulky muzzle
  • German Shepherd: Muzzle & ears more often darker than face, but no obvious masks

Coat Color:

  • Wolves: White through cream; buff, tawny; reddish; brownish; gray to black; no sharp contrasts; agouti grays tend to dominate, other colors increasing higher the latitude; never born white; lighten with age
  • Husky: White; white with saddle; silver and white; agouti (banded coat); gray; wolf gray; black; mostly black; light red; copper; commonly a variety of masks
  • Malamute: White always on underbody, parts of legs, feet and masked markings; distinct widow’s peak; light gray through middle shadings of black; gold through shadings of red to liver
  • Wolfdogs: Solid black or gray; tan/gold with black saddle; sable are most common; blue, livers, albinos & whites uncommon 

Having very similar or mutually-shared characteristics makes it difficult, if not impossible, to distinguish from high-content wolfdogs and wolves. 

These are some wolves that look very similar, characteristic-wise, to the high-content wolfdog or wolf in the GIF above:

I think that this is possibly a very high-content wolfdog to a wolf. It’s faulty to claim to be able to undoubtedly distinguish a wolfdog from a domestic dog or a wolfdog from a wolf without a thorough scientific analysis of the physical characteristics of the animal (not judging from a photo). The best identification the majority of people can do is to make an educated guess. 

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(Source: lonestray)

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By Andre Haberle

(Source: lonestray)

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(Source: lonestray)